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Today’s teens drink, date less than ‘70s counterparts, study says

Teenagers aren’t in a rush to grow up. They’re not as interested in dating, snagging jobs or driving, according to a new academic study. 

Researchers from San Diego State University and Bryn Mawr College conducted a study, released Tuesday, to determine how soon adolescents engage in adult activities. 

To do so, they compared teenagers from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s with teens from today, using surveys that questioned more than 8 million children, ages 13 to 19, from 1976 to 2016. The poll focused on topics including sex, alcohol and part-time jobs, and it also factored in race, region and gender. 

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After analyzing the results, they found that teens were not having sex, drinking or holding jobs nearly as much as those from 20 years ago. 

Among eighth-graders, only about half of them had held down a job or tried alcohol, compared with those in the ‘90s. As for older teens or those in the 12th grade, the number of youth getting their driver’s license, working, drinking and dating was down nearly 20 percent, compared with those from 40 years ago. 

“The developmental trajectory of adolescence has slowed, with teens growing up more slowly than they used to,” Jean M. Twenge, lead author of the study and professor of psychology at San Diego State University, said in a Tuesday news release. “In terms of adult activities, 18-year-olds now look like 15-year-olds once did.”

While researchers could not pinpoint why minors engage in fewer adult activities, they say homework or extracurricular activities were not a factor as those activities had decreased among eighth-and 12th-graders and was steady for 12th-graders and college students. 

However, they believe their findings, which were published in Society for Research in Child Development’s bimonthly journal, could be associated with increased internet and social media usage.

“Our study suggests that teens today are taking longer to embrace both adult responsibilities (such as driving and working) and adult pleasures (such as sex and alcohol),” said Heejung Park, study co-author and assistant professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr. “These trends are neither good nor bad, but reflect the current U.S. cultural climate.”

Man's Body Decomposed In Airport Parking Lot For 8 Months

Man's Body Decomposed In Airport Parking Lot For 8 Months

Teen returns lost wallet with $1,500 stuffed inside and it was all caught on camera

A big hug for a California teenager who found a wallet with $1,500 inside and returned it to its rightful owner.

That’s what Melissa Vang did when 18-year-old Tyler Opdyke showed up at her door to make sure she had found the lost wallet. He had hidden it under her doormat when no one answered his knock.

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This is how it happened. Opdyke was handing out fliers for his uncle’s pesticide business, according to KOVR, when he stumbled upon the wallet bulging with cash. 

Vang’s husband had dropped it as he was leaving the home

“I just really thought about what I would want someone to do if I were to drop my wallet,” Opdyke told KOVR. “And then I thought about the house. I thought about the family who lived there.”

When he rang the doorbell to return the wallet, no one answered, because Vang was afraid to go to the door, but surveillance video captured Opdyke holding up the wallet .

>> Related: Lost wallet returned with painfully honest letter about why thief kept cash

So he hid the wallet under the doormat and returned later to make sure the family had found it. This time Vang and her two daughters answered the door. They hugged Opdyke and thanked him for his honesty and integrity in returning the lost money.

Father high on heroin pushes son in stroller down 7-foot hill, police say

A Butler, Pennsylvania, father was arrested and jailed Sunday after he was accused of putting his 5-year-old in son danger.

He allegedly pushed his son, who was in a stroller, over a 7-foot hill while high on heroin, according to the Butler City Police Department.

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Butler police said Charles Brookbank had his son strapped into the stroller. He had visitation with his son that day.

Detectives said that while he was walking with the stroller, Brookbank ran into telephone poles, bushes and stopped to buy heroin before taking the drug.

Multiple people said they saw the erratic behavior.

“He even left the child at a busy intersection at a stop sign for a while,” Butler City Deputy Police Chief Dave Adam said.

Police said that as they arrived on the scene, Brookbank was overdosing. He lost his footing, fell on top of the baby stroller and plummeted down a hill. 

Police said the boy was taken to the hospital to be checked out. He is OK and back with his mother.

“It’s the kids, it's the families, this is what heroin does,” Adam said. “These are the victims.”

What is storm surge and why is it dangerous?

What is storm surge, how does it happen and why should you be wary of it? Here is a quick look at storm surge.

What is storm surge?

A storm surge is water pushed inland as a hurricane advances and makes landfall.

How does it form?

Imagine a bowl of water. Put your hand in the middle of the bowl and cup it. Now slowly push your hand toward the edge of the bowl. Those are the same dynamics as storm surge. The ocean water is pushed by winds and waves, and is also sucked into the air near the eye of the hurricane by low pressure.

Is it a “wall of water” that rushes in?

Rarely. It is usually a rise of water that can happen quickly, moving at the same rate as the forward speed of a hurricane. 

How powerful is a storm surge?

Very powerful. Only 1 cubic yard of sea water weighs 1,728 pounds. A 6-inch surge can knock a person down.

How dangerous is it?

Storm surge kills more people in a hurricane than all other components of the storm. The overwhelming majority of deaths in the 10 deadliest U.S. landfalling hurricanes were the result of storm surge.

How can I stay safe?

Get away from it. A surge 1 foot deep can take a car off a road. Get out early, because the surge can begin up to 24 hours before landfall. During Hurricane Katrina, people stayed in their homes and died there when the surge filled their homes with water and they could not escape. Also, don’t leave pets at home. Many animals died when people left them in their homes during Hurricane Katrina.

Police: 2 transit workers accused of raping ‘incapacitated’ Auburn University student on bus

Two employees of the transit system at Auburn University have been accused of raping an 18-year-old student on one of the buses Friday night. 

Tony Martin Patillo, 51, of Columbus, Georgia, and James Don Johnson Jr., 32, of Auburn, are each charged with first-degree rape and first-degree sodomy, according to Lee County Jail records. Patillo is also charged with four counts of public lewdness. 

The Opelika-Auburn News reported that the lewdness charges stem from an incident just before midnight on Friday in which witnesses spotted a man exposing himself while standing over a woman on the ground. Patillo was arrested when responding officers found him nearby.

Detectives conducting additional investigation into the incident learned that Patillo had allegedly sexually assaulted the woman, who appeared to be incapacitated, while on the bus, the News reported.

The woman, who was no longer present when Patillo was arrested, was identified and tracked down by police officers, whom she told about the alleged rape. According to investigators, Johnson drove the bus and “engaged in actions to perpetuate the crime while Patillo was in the rear of the bus, assaulting the victim,” the News reported

Patillo exited the bus with the woman in the area where the passersby spotted him exposing himself a few minutes later, police officials said. 

The Auburn Plainsman, the university’s student newspaper, reported that the alleged assault took place on a Tiger Ten bus that runs from the downtown area to multiple apartment complexes and student housing areas off-campus. The late-night buses are specifically designed to give students a safe ride home. 

“Our top concern is the well-being of the victim, and we cannot stress in strong enough terms our shock and distress over this despicable act,” officials with Auburn’s Department of Campus Safety and Security said in a statement. “We immediately provided support and all available resources to the victim and continue to do so.”

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The Plainsman reported that the university operates campus security shuttles to take students to on-campus locations late at night. Tiger Transit and Tiger Ten buses are operated by outside contractor First Transit.

First Transit is required in its contract with Auburn University to perform background checks on all of its drivers, the campus newspaper said. Company officials told the Plainsman it is performing its own internal investigation of the alleged assault. 

“At First Transit, we are greatly troubled by the events of Friday night,” officials said in a statement. “The safe and reliable transportation of our passengers is our highest priority. It is a responsibility we take very seriously.”

Both Patillo and Johnson were immediately removed from service and First Transit has begun termination proceedings, the statement read. Company officials said they are working with campus and city police in the investigation. 

Auburn University is re-evaluating its contract with First Transit, the Plainsman reported

Patillo was being held in the Lee County Jail in lieu of $127,000 bail, the News reported. Johnson was being held in lieu of $125,000 bail. 

Hurricane Jose and Hurricane Maria: Live updates

Hurricane Maria is bearing down on the Caribbean and is set to pass over much the same area devastated by Hurricane Irma nearly two weeks ago.

Farther north, Hurricane Jose is expected to bring tropical storm-force winds of up to 50 mph along the coasts of New Jersey and New York on Tuesday evening, the National Hurricane Center reports.

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‘Hot single female’ uses creative sign to get electricity back after Hurricane Irma

One Florida woman who lost electricity during Hurricane Irma decided to take an unusual route to get the attention of workers.

Yahoo Lifestyle WFTS reported that Kynse Angles of Fort Myers, Florida, took some pink spray paint and created a sign reading “Hot single female seeks sexy lineman to electrify her life.”

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Wearing a pink tank top, white shorts and heels, she posed next to the sign outside and posted the photo on Instagram and Facebook Sunday.

Angles, 37, who has lived with Type 1 diabetes since childhood, had a kidney and pancreas transplant Sept. 1 before the storm.

Angles told Yahoo Lifestyle she was discharged from a Tampa, Florida, hospital too early because of a rush to release patients before the storm. She said she had problems at a nearby hotel and had to spend the storm and several days afterward at the hospital.

“I said, ‘I want my bed. I’m single. It’s hot outside. I need electricity,’” she said.

Angles said she thought the sign would be funny.

“That was my idea. I like to be humorous,” she told Yahoo Life.

“I just thought maybe if a lineman got to my neighborhood they’ll laugh and hook me up first,” Angles told WFTS.

The photo of the sign received hundreds of shares and likes on Facebook.

As it gained traction online, a Fort Myers radio station had Angles on air, which she said also played a big role in regaining power quickly.

It all worked: Later that day, Angles’ power had been restored.

Homeowner draws weapon on suspected burglar, commended by police

A Marysville, Washington, man came face to face with a burglar and drew his weapon. Police say it was the right decision and may have prevented any further problems during the confrontation. It was a confrontation that was also caught on surveillance cameras.

Joe Hemrich said he was sitting in his living room chair Monday night when he heard a noise outside. He turned on his surveillance cameras but didn’t see anything.

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Not knowing what it was, he went outside to investigate and found a man in his driveway under his carport. Several shelves and drawers he kept in the area appeared to be ransacked. The man who turned toward him was brandishing what looked like a baton or stick.

Hemrich said he drew his weapon, which he had been trained to use for over a decade, and ordered the man back.

“When I first saw the guy, nerves got me and I’m thinking, ‘Oh goodness. This is happening.’”

Hemrich said the suspect dropped what was in his hand, backed away and got down on the ground when told to do so.

“I felt very good about it because I don't want to shoot anybody,” he said. “Nobody does.”

The suspect was on the ground when police arrived and only tried to run when Hemrich disarmed himself when told to do so by police.

Hemrich said he was concerned because his family was home. He also admitted that he didn’t want to fire his weapon when he was so close to his neighbor’s house.

For Hemrich, watching surveillance video again was unsettling, but he wanted to share his story because he felt that this time something went “right” with a gun.

“You can’t train for the emotions you’re going to feel when you're actually face to face,” Hemrich said. Marysville police agree.

Authorities said an officer was able to quickly catch the suspect even though he ran from the scene.

Police booked the suspect on theft and trespass charges. They say he’s also wanted on several other charges.

How likely will the ‘big one’ occur in our lifetime?

Editor's Note: This story first appeared July 16, 2015 and answers questions inspired by an article written by The New Yorker's Kathryn Schulz. Her story, "The Really Big One," was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing on Monday. The Pulitzer Prize is considered journalism's highest honor.

>> Read more trending news

Some in the Northwest have admitted to losing sleep after the New Yorker's terrifying article on how the "big one" will devastate Seattle and everything west of Interstate 5. 

"If the entire [Cascade Subduction] zone gives way at once, an event that seismologists call a full-margin rupture, the magnitude will be somewhere between 8.7 and 9.2," wrote Kathyrn Schulz. "That’s the very big one."

People are calling into the Seattle Emergency Management Office asking what they can do -- and if Seattle is prepared. 

Debbie Goetz with the department said the city is prepared for the "big one."

She says the best advice for people living here is to have an emergency plan: Discuss with your family where and how you'd meet up in the event of an emergency that knocks out cellphone service.

Local experts -- from Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, Seattle Emergency Management Office, and The Seattle Times -- weighed in on the Cascadia earthquake during an Ask Me Anything on Reddit

John Vidale, director of the PNSN, wrote in the AMA, “ Overall, it was a well-written and documented article. The scenario left an impression of much greater devastation that is anticipated to occur, however."

As the science in Schulz's article is correct, below are seven questions and answers that may bring a little calm. 

1. You say the average frequency of such an event is 1 in 300 years. Do you know if the distribution is roughly uniform? My guess is that it would tend to decrease over time -- but I've also just googled and found articles that suggest continental drift is actually speeding up. Or is the distribution of big earthquakes something that we don't really have a good handle on at the moment? 

Good question. At the highest magnitude, the magnitude-frequency distribution is no longer exponential. The Gutenberg-Richter distribution is recast as the truncated or doubly-truncated Gutenberg Richter distribution, which reflects approaching a physical limit on the possible size of earthquakes.

I think the global limit is thought to be somewhere around 10. But remember, breakage of Cascadia has a small chance of triggering the Queen Charlotte fault, which has a small chance of triggering big faults along the Aleutians. So in the case of very, very, very rare and large events, one is not limited to just one fault.

2. Will Seattle (or anywhere in the PNW, really) ever implement earthquake early warning systems as mentioned in the New Yorker article about Japan?

We [PNSN] are currently testing earthquake early warning in the Pacific Northwest, in fact I have it on my phone now.

It needs more testing and full funding before it is ready to be released to the public, however. 

3. How would a major earthquake affect the nearby volcanoes? 

The same process of subduction - where one tectonic plate dives under another - is responsible for both our earthquake risk and the creation of our volcanoes. In other places, like Chile, volcanic eruptions have followed major earthquakes. Several of Japan's volcanoes became more active after their M 9 quake and tsunami in 2011. But I haven't heard of any good evidence that Mount Rainier or other Cascade volcanoes erupted in a serious way in 1700, the year of our last megaquake. 

4. Any chance of a NW quake setting off the Yellowstone caldera? 

Zero. And a Yellowstone eruption is so unlikely and so prevalent among questions from the public that it is a major source of irritation to many scientists. 

5. Did you see inaccuracies in the New Yorker article or was there anything about it that bothered you? 

Overall, it was a well-written and documented article. The scenario left an impression of much greater devastation that is anticipated to occur, however. 

6. What are the chances "the big one" will never come in our lifetime? How much do most of us not understand about probability and statistics when it comes to natural disasters like earthquakes?

If the chance it will come is 15%, the chance it won't come is 85% (if we're expecting to live another 50 years). However, there are plenty of "pretty big ones" to worry about as well, so you're overwhelming likely to see some action in the PNW.

Statistically, we're more likely to have another deep source quake like the Nisqually, that occurred in 2001. Chances for another one are above 80% within the next 50 years.

7. How realistic is it that 3 days' supplies (the minimum recommended) will enable my survival of the Very Big One in Seattle? And how many days' supplies do you personally have in your home ready for an earthquake?

We recommend people prepare themselves for 7 to 10 days vs. three. For a major quake, life won't be back to "normal" after just three days. I've got enough at home to make it through a week, and also keep a stash of stuff in my car as well as at work.

Beyond supplies, I always encourage people to talk about their plans - especially around communication, which we know will be affected. Where will they be? How can they get back together? Where could they meet if not at home? 

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