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Even at anything-goes Carnival, these lyrics raise eyebrows

The typical notion of Carnival in Brazil is that anything goes: no headdress too big, no outfit too small, no song too ribald. This year, some organizers of the world's best known street party are saying: "Enough!" At least to the lyrics.

A growing number of "blocos" — a term Brazilians use to refer to Carnival street parties and the singing and dancing groups that organize them — are defying tradition and refusing to play a handful of songs that have lyrics considered sexist, homophobic or racist.

If you think Brazilians have met that with their trademark easygoing, live-and-let-live attitude, then you don't know how seriously they take Carnival.

"Carnival is political," said Debora Thome, one of the founders of the feminist bloco Mulheres Rodadas. "Carnival in Brazil reflects a lot of what we see in our day-to-day life."

The controversy centers on "marchinhas," songs that are a part of traditional Carnival performances and can be crass or even violent. Among the marchinhas that blocos are bristling at is one that suggests hitting a woman who irritates the singer. "This woman has provoked me for some time / Give it to her! Give it to her!" it goes. Another asks if a man is gay because he has abundant hair — and then calls for that hair to be chopped off.

It's not clear how many blocos nationwide are eschewing offensive lyrics, or why it's created so much controversy this year. Some suggest the move to drop the songs is hitting a nerve at a time of great uncertainty in Brazil: The economy is in a deep recession, the country's first female president was impeached and removed from office last year, and a big corruption probe has revealed that graft is almost a way of life for the political class.

That uncertainty has combined with a growing consciousness in Brazil about issues of race, gender and sexuality. While more than half of Brazil's population identifies as black or mixed race, people from those groups have only recently begun to gain access in significant numbers to cultural areas that have traditionally excluded them, like universities, prominent acting roles or high-level political positions.

The blocos that are tweaking offensive lyrics or dropping songs from their repertoire say that Carnival shouldn't make anyone uncomfortable.

"Carnival is democratic," said Willians Medeiros, an organizer of Sao Paulo's Bloco MinhoQueens, which has dropped several songs. "It has to be entertaining for everyone, not for just some."

On the other side, some deride the decision to pull songs as a political correctness that has no place in Carnival, where everything and anything is made fun of.

Pedro Ernesto Marinho, the president of Rio de Janeiro's Cordao da Bola Preta, which is celebrating its 99th year in 2017, said Carnival has always been irreverent. "If you make it politically correct ... you have a boring celebration."

In one song many blocos have cited as offensive, the singer woos a mixed-raced woman: "But since the color won't rub off, mulata / Mulata, I want your love."

Or at least that's one reading of it. Pedro Goncalves, one of the founders of Sao Paulo's Bloco Bastardo, says his reading has always been that the singer is saying that since he can't have the woman's color, he'll take her love instead. He said a third reading, based on research into the slang of the 1930s when the song was written, suggests that the singer is saying that color doesn't matter.

But Goncalves, who is white, acknowledges that black people he knows typically say they hear the first interpretation, and his group has pulled the song.

In general, marchinhas are peppered with the word mulata, an antiquated term for a mixed-race woman that is common in Latin America but that many consider offensive. Mulheres Rodadas considered forgoing a song that uses it, but opted to keep it because they felt the song, in general, is empowering.

While some worry about lost traditions, others say nothing could be more traditional during Carnival than worrying about lost traditions.

James N. Green, director of the Brazil Initiative at Brown University's Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, says there is a constant debate about whether Carnival has deteriorated or lost its glamour.

"That's a constant," said Green. "You read that every single year."

___

Sarah DiLorenzo on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/sdilorenzo .

Even at anything-goes Carnival, these lyrics raise eyebrows

The typical notion of Carnival in Brazil is that anything goes: no headdress too big, no outfit too small, no song too ribald. This year, some organizers of the world's best known street party are saying: "Enough!" At least to the lyrics.

A growing number of "blocos" — a term Brazilians use to refer to Carnival street parties and the singing and dancing groups that organize them — are defying tradition and refusing to play a handful of songs that have lyrics considered sexist, homophobic or racist.

If you think Brazilians have met that with their trademark easygoing, live-and-let-live attitude, then you don't know how seriously they take Carnival.

"Carnival is political," said Debora Thome, one of the founders of the feminist bloco Mulheres Rodadas. "Carnival in Brazil reflects a lot of what we see in our day-to-day life."

The controversy centers on "marchinhas," songs that are a part of traditional Carnival performances and can be crass or even violent. Among the marchinhas that blocos are bristling at is one that suggests hitting a woman who irritates the singer. "This woman has provoked me for some time / Give it to her! Give it to her!" it goes. Another asks if a man is gay because he has abundant hair — and then calls for that hair to be chopped off.

It's not clear how many blocos nationwide are eschewing offensive lyrics, or why it's created so much controversy this year. Some suggest the move to drop the songs is hitting a nerve at a time of great uncertainty in Brazil: The economy is in a deep recession, the country's first female president was impeached and removed from office last year, and a big corruption probe has revealed that graft is almost a way of life for the political class.

That uncertainty has combined with a growing consciousness in Brazil about issues of race, gender and sexuality. While more than half of Brazil's population identifies as black or mixed race, people from those groups have only recently begun to gain access in significant numbers to cultural areas that have traditionally excluded them, like universities, prominent acting roles or high-level political positions.

The blocos that are tweaking offensive lyrics or dropping songs from their repertoire say that Carnival shouldn't make anyone uncomfortable.

"Carnival is democratic," said Willians Medeiros, an organizer of Sao Paulo's Bloco MinhoQueens, which has dropped several songs. "It has to be entertaining for everyone, not for just some."

On the other side, some deride the decision to pull songs as a political correctness that has no place in Carnival, where everything and anything is made fun of.

Pedro Ernesto Marinho, the president of Rio de Janeiro's Cordao da Bola Preta, which is celebrating its 99th year in 2017, said Carnival has always been irreverent. "If you make it politically correct ... you have a boring celebration."

In one song many blocos have cited as offensive, the singer woos a mixed-raced woman: "But since the color won't rub off, mulata / Mulata, I want your love."

Or at least that's one reading of it. Pedro Goncalves, one of the founders of Sao Paulo's Bloco Bastardo, says his reading has always been that the singer is saying that since he can't have the woman's color, he'll take her love instead. He said a third reading, based on research into the slang of the 1930s when the song was written, suggests that the singer is saying that color doesn't matter.

But Goncalves, who is white, acknowledges that black people he knows typically say they hear the first interpretation, and his group has pulled the song.

In general, marchinhas are peppered with the word mulata, an antiquated term for a mixed-race woman that is common in Latin America but that many consider offensive. Mulheres Rodadas considered forgoing a song that uses it, but opted to keep it because they felt the song, in general, is empowering.

While some worry about lost traditions, others say nothing could be more traditional during Carnival than worrying about lost traditions.

James N. Green, director of the Brazil Initiative at Brown University's Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, says there is a constant debate about whether Carnival has deteriorated or lost its glamour.

"That's a constant," said Green. "You read that every single year."

___

Sarah DiLorenzo on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/sdilorenzo .

Video shows Harrison Ford wrongly flying over airliner

Video released Tuesday shows a plane piloted by Harrison Ford suddenly and mistakenly flying low over an airliner with 110 people aboard at a Southern California airport.

The 45 seconds of soundless video show the 74-year-old "Star Wars" and "Indiana Jones" star's potentially serious mishap at John Wayne Airport in Orange County.

In it, an American Airlines 737 is taxiing slowly. Then Ford's yellow, single-engine Aviat Husky suddenly zooms in from the right of the frame, flying low over the airliner and casting its shadow down the middle of the bigger plane before landing on the taxiway.

Ford was supposed to have landed on a runway that runs parallel to the taxiway.

"Was that airliner meant to be underneath me?" Ford asks in previously released sound from the air traffic control tower.

But for the airliner, the taxiway and runway are both wide-open and apparently unmistakable. The video then shows the same landing from the back, giving more time to the approach of Ford's plane, but the flyover itself is barely visible.

No reason has been given for why Ford made the mistake, and his publicist has not replied to requests for comment.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the incident.

American Airlines Flight 1456, with 110 passengers and six crew members aboard, departed safely for Dallas a few minutes later.

Ford collects vintage planes and has a long and good record as an aviator.

But he has had several close-calls and a serious accident in March 2015 when he was injured in his World War II-era trainer as it crashed on a Los Angeles golf course.

Photos: Toy Fair 2017

Review: In 'Get Out,' the two-faced horrors of racism

"Do they know I'm black?" Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) asks his white girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams) as they get ready to leave their city apartment for a weekend at her parents' rural estate. "No," she replies. "Should they?"

"It seems like something you might want to mention," he sighs. "I don't want to get chased off the lawn with a shotgun."

It's a joke but it's also foreshadowing — and just a hint of the frights to come. In Peele's directorial debut, the former "Key and Peele" star has —as he often did on that satirical sketch series — turned inside out even supposedly progressive assumptions about race. But Peele has largely left comedy behind in a more chilling portrait of the racism that lurks beneath smiling white faces and defensive, paper-thin protestations like, "But I voted for Obama!" and "Isn't Tiger Woods amazing?"

Those are the kinds of things that Rose's father, Dean (an excellent Bradley Whitford), says as he and his wife, Missy (Catherine Keener), heartily welcomes his daughter's boyfriend. "How long has this thang been going on?" Dean asks with forced emphasis on "thang."

But the warm welcome is only skin deep. A deeply bizarre atmosphere takes hold at the house, where all the hired help is black. They are a spooky, robotic bunch, with dead eyes and zombie-like demeanors that would have stood out even in "The Stepford Wives." Something clearly is off, though Peele takes his time letting the mystery thicken.

"Get Out," produced by Jason Blum's low-budget horror studio Blumhouse Productions, is serious, even sober in its horror. But its archness has moments of creepy levity. When Chris is given a tour of the house, Dean points out the sealed door to the basement. "Black mold," he says.

Things get even stranger when Chris meets some of the family friends, who all appear oddly frozen in time somehow. Some ogle him with lust, feeling his biceps. The most paranoid (and funny) character in the movie is Chris' friend, Rod (a terrific Lil Rel Howery), a TSA agent who — dubious from the start — grows increasingly concerned with every update from Chris.

Eventually, the truth comes out, things turn bloody and, as you'd expect, we get a look at that basement.

It's long been a lamentable joke that in horror films — never the most inclusive of genres — the black dude is always the first to go. In this way, "Get Out" is radical and refreshing in its perspective. The movie is entirely from Chris's point of view; his fears are ours.

Peele originally conceived his long-planned film as an Obama-era horror, one that revealed the hidden racism that the country had supposedly overcome. "Get Out" instead comes out at a time where few still hold any belief in a post-racial America. The dark forces unleashed in "Get Out" came out of hiding long ago.

"Get Out," a Universal Pictures release, is rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for "violence, bloody images, and language including sexual references." Running time: 103 minutes. Three stars out of four.

___

Follow AP Film Writer on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Review: 'Contemporary Color' is a hypnotic concert film

those baton and saber twirling staples of small town parades and high school football games. The musicians, including the likes of St. Vincent, Lucius, Ad-Rock, Zola Jesus and Nelly Furtado, composed original songs that the color guard teams then used to choreograph a corresponding routine. The unique spectacle, which took place at Brooklyn's Barclays Center, is chronicled with experimental verve in the documentary "Contemporary Color ," from filmmaking brothers Bill and Turner Ross.

Narrative is of little consequence in "Contemporary Color." The Ross brothers show some interest in the excitable high school students from various parts of the country who have devoted most of the free time of their young lives to their color guard teams. This strange, high profile gig will also be the last time many are performing together. But the audience doesn't get to know any individual well enough for that to have any sort of emotional impact.

Maybe it'll remind some of their long lost high school passions, but the most remarkable thing about these youngsters is what happens when they're on the stage moving in tandem in an eye-popping swirl of sequins and flags. You forget that just a minute ago they were giggly and emotional and inarticulate in that way that most normal people are when a camera is pointed at them.

The Ross bros. employ various techniques to keep the sights stimulating, dreamily overlaying images and sounds in hypnotically retro fashion. They were right to keep "Contemporary Color" on the experimental side, but the film isn't immune from dragging some. After a handful of performances, they do start to blend together a bit. Perhaps that's because they have the unenviable task of documenting the entire show for an audience who will be watching it separated by a screen, making it that much more difficult to convey the actual energy of a live performance.

Off stage, too, the film can't help but stumble onto the high/low divide between the color guard art that they're purportedly celebrating and the fact that many of the students and coaches participating simply haven't heard of some of the indie musicians they've been paired up with. The film isn't out to mock anyone, nor is Byrne, who seems genuinely delighted by the color guard troupes. And yet I couldn't help but feel a slight queasiness watching three grown men standing in the hall of a high school having to tell the camera that they had not heard of the act How to Dress Well.

The Ross brothers have established themselves as distinct and lovely voices in the documentary world. Their three previous features, "45365," ''Tchoupitoulas" and "Western" are lyrical and humanistic. "Contemporary Color," constrained by an established story, exists outside of that. They put their own spin on the concert film, but I'm not entirely convinced that "Contemporary Color," despite its earnest intentions, will hold the attention of anyone who wasn't already interested.

"Contemporary Color," an Oscilloscope Laboratories release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for "brief strong language." Running time: 107 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.

___

MPAA Definition of PG-13: Parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

---

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Rihanna breaks Michael Jackson's Billboard record

Rihanna turned 29 Monday, and this week she has more than a birthday to celebrate.

Mashable reported Tuesday that the singer has broken Michael Jackson's record for the most top-10 Billboard singles.

>> Read more trending stories

Billboard reported that Rihanna has earned her 30th top-10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with her single "Love on the Brain" from her latest album, 2016's "Anti."

The ranking means she has broken her third-place tie with Michael Jackson, who had 29 top-10 singles as a solo artist.

Rihanna's introduction to the chart came in 2015, when she got her first top-10 hit with "Pon De Replay." She's is only second to The Beatles for the time it took for her to get 30 top-10 singles on the chart in 10 years, seven months and two weeks. It took The Beatles five years, nine months and two weeks to do the same from 1964 to 1969.

Interestingly, one of Rihanna's singles in the 30-song tally include "FourFiveSeconds" with Kanye West and former Beatle Paul McCartney.

Congrats to Rih!

Lindsay Lohan says she was stopped in airport for wearing headscarf

Lindsay Lohan has made headlines for her move to London and her new accent, but now she's speaking about chatter that she is converting to Islam.

NBC News reported that in a new interview, Lohan said she was stopped in an airport and asked to take off her headscarf.

>> Read more trending stories

Lohan was photographed with the Quran under her arm, prompting "Good Morning Britain" co-host Susana Reid  to ask her about reports that the actress has converted to Islam.

"Me studying the Quran is something I find solace in … I do study it. Nothing is confirmed yet," she said.

When pressed about the issue by co-host Piers Morgan, Lohan said, "Religion is a personal belief. My sister's a Buddhist. It's a consideration I have."

Morgan pressed further, asking why she was reluctant to say she is converting. Lohan said, "I don't want to comment on something I haven't finished yet. I don't think that's right."

After Morgan mentioned how "polarizing" it would be to discuss interest in Islam in America, Lohan discussed an incident in which she said she was profiled for wearing a headscarf.

"When I was flying to New York recently, I was wearing a headscarf, and I got stopped at the airport … "(The agent) opened my passport and saw 'Lindsay Lohan' and started apologizing but said, 'Take off your headscarf.'"

The co-hosts expressed surprise at what Lohan said.

"I mean, it's OK," she continued. "But what scared me was that moment, how would another woman who doesn't feel comfortable taking off her headscarf feel? That was really interesting to me. I was kind of in shock."

Lohan said she could not speak to why she had been asked to take off her headscarf, but said that it was "jarring."

"It was strange. I'm from New York," she said. "I'm born and raised there, so I was a little intimidated."

Lohan said she was wearing the headscarf because she was traveling from Turkey, where The Associated Press reported she met President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and did so "out of personal respect for certain countries that I go to when I see certain people."

Despite some reports, video of the interview posted by "Good Morning Britain" does not show Lohan saying she was in fact racially profiled.

NBC News reported that, according to Gov.uk, passengers have the right to not remove their headgear.

"If you're wearing head gear for religious or cultural reasons, you can ask for it to be checked using a hand-held scanner so you don't have to remove it," the site said.

Watch the video from "Good Morning Britain" below.

Box Office Top 20: 'Lego Batman,' 'Fifty Shades' stay on top

Holdovers "The Lego Batman Movie" and "Fifty Shades Darker" led the North American box office for a second week, while Matt Damon's "The Great Wall" — a hit in China, where it was made — struggled in its domestic debut.

Warner Bros.' "The Lego Batman Movie" was No.1 again, selling $42.7 million in tickets over the four-day holiday weekend, according to final figures Tuesday from comScore. Universal's "Fifty Shades Darker," which led overseas business, earned $22.7 million Friday through Monday.

But Universal's critically panned action epic "The Great Wall," the most expensive film ever made in China with a budget of $150 million, failed to make as much of an impact as it did on the other side of the world. After racking up $171 million in China earlier this year, the North American bow of director Zhang Yimou's film netted $21.5 million. New releases "Fist Fight," the Fox comedy starring Ice Cube and Charlie Day ($14.1 million), and Gore Verbinski's "A Cure for Wellness" ($5 million) also struggled.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Monday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Tuesday by comScore:

1. "The Lego Batman Movie," Warner Bros., $42,744,131, 4,088 locations, $10,456 average, $107,310,445, 2 weeks.

2. "Fifty Shades Darker," Universal, $22,683,970, 3,714 locations, $6,108 average, $91,380,425, 2 weeks.

3. "The Great Wall," Universal, $21,508,490, 3,325 locations, $6,469 average, $21,508,490, 1 week.

4. "John Wick: Chapter Two," Lionsgate, $18,981,463, 3,113 locations, $6,097 average, $61,173,546, 2 weeks.

5. "Fist Fight," Warner Bros., $14,121,149, 3,185 locations, $4,434 average, $14,121,149, 1 week.

6. "Hidden Figures," 20th Century Fox, $9,010,782, 2,217 locations, $4,064 average, $144,502,612, 9 weeks.

7. "Split," Universal, $8,488,990, 2,445 locations, $3,472 average, $125,054,520, 5 weeks.

8. "A Dog's Purpose," Universal, $7,472,185, 2,400 locations, $3,113 average, $52,587,695, 4 weeks.

9. "La La Land," Lionsgate, $5,640,915, 1,587 locations, $3,554 average, $134,644,981, 11 weeks.

10. "Lion," The Weinstein Company, $5,144,385, 1,542 locations, $3,336 average, $37,399,868, 13 weeks.

11. "A Cure For Wellness," 20th Century Fox, $5,004,463, 2,704 locations, $1,851 average, $5,004,463, 1 week.

12. "Rings," Paramount, $2,729,286, 1,560 locations, $1,750 average, $26,152,504, 3 weeks.

13. "Moana," Disney, $1,457,717, 424 locations, $3,438 average, $244,912,679, 13 weeks.

14. "I Am Not Your Negro," Magnolia Pictures, $1,258,942, 260 locations, $4,842 average, $3,493,364, 3 weeks.

15. "Everybody Loves Somebody," Lionsgate, $1,067,515, 333 locations, $3,206 average, $1,067,515, 1 week.

16. "Sing," Universal, $1,046,055, 561 locations, $1,865 average, $266,977,160, 9 weeks.

17. "Fences," Paramount, $1,032,350, 560 locations, $1,843 average, $55,379,319, 10 weeks.

18. "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story," Disney, $996,014, 435 locations, $2,290 average, $528,807,482, 10 weeks.

19. "2017 Oscar Shorts," Magnolia Pictures, $783,978, 270 locations, $2,904 average, $1,824,225, 2 weeks.

20. "Moonlight," A24, $671,582, 455 locations, $1,476 average, $21,294,977, 18 weeks.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

Box Office Top 20: 'Lego Batman,' 'Fifty Shades' stay on top

Holdovers "The Lego Batman Movie" and "Fifty Shades Darker" led the North American box office for a second week, while Matt Damon's "The Great Wall" — a hit in China, where it was made — struggled in its domestic debut.

Warner Bros.' "The Lego Batman Movie" was No.1 again, selling $42.7 million in tickets over the four-day holiday weekend, according to final figures Tuesday from comScore. Universal's "Fifty Shades Darker," which led overseas business, earned $22.7 million Friday through Monday.

But Universal's critically panned action epic "The Great Wall," the most expensive film ever made in China with a budget of $150 million, failed to make as much of an impact as it did on the other side of the world. After racking up $171 million in China earlier this year, the North American bow of director Zhang Yimou's film netted $21.5 million. New releases "Fist Fight," the Fox comedy starring Ice Cube and Charlie Day ($14.1 million), and Gore Verbinski's "A Cure for Wellness" ($5 million) also struggled.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Monday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Tuesday by comScore:

1. "The Lego Batman Movie," Warner Bros., $42,744,131, 4,088 locations, $10,456 average, $107,310,445, 2 weeks.

2. "Fifty Shades Darker," Universal, $22,683,970, 3,714 locations, $6,108 average, $91,380,425, 2 weeks.

3. "The Great Wall," Universal, $21,508,490, 3,325 locations, $6,469 average, $21,508,490, 1 week.

4. "John Wick: Chapter Two," Lionsgate, $18,981,463, 3,113 locations, $6,097 average, $61,173,546, 2 weeks.

5. "Fist Fight," Warner Bros., $14,121,149, 3,185 locations, $4,434 average, $14,121,149, 1 week.

6. "Hidden Figures," 20th Century Fox, $9,010,782, 2,217 locations, $4,064 average, $144,502,612, 9 weeks.

7. "Split," Universal, $8,488,990, 2,445 locations, $3,472 average, $125,054,520, 5 weeks.

8. "A Dog's Purpose," Universal, $7,472,185, 2,400 locations, $3,113 average, $52,587,695, 4 weeks.

9. "La La Land," Lionsgate, $5,640,915, 1,587 locations, $3,554 average, $134,644,981, 11 weeks.

10. "Lion," The Weinstein Company, $5,144,385, 1,542 locations, $3,336 average, $37,399,868, 13 weeks.

11. "A Cure For Wellness," 20th Century Fox, $5,004,463, 2,704 locations, $1,851 average, $5,004,463, 1 week.

12. "Rings," Paramount, $2,729,286, 1,560 locations, $1,750 average, $26,152,504, 3 weeks.

13. "Moana," Disney, $1,457,717, 424 locations, $3,438 average, $244,912,679, 13 weeks.

14. "I Am Not Your Negro," Magnolia Pictures, $1,258,942, 260 locations, $4,842 average, $3,493,364, 3 weeks.

15. "Everybody Loves Somebody," Lionsgate, $1,067,515, 333 locations, $3,206 average, $1,067,515, 1 week.

16. "Sing," Universal, $1,046,055, 561 locations, $1,865 average, $266,977,160, 9 weeks.

17. "Fences," Paramount, $1,032,350, 560 locations, $1,843 average, $55,379,319, 10 weeks.

18. "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story," Disney, $996,014, 435 locations, $2,290 average, $528,807,482, 10 weeks.

19. "2017 Oscar Shorts," Magnolia Pictures, $783,978, 270 locations, $2,904 average, $1,824,225, 2 weeks.

20. "Moonlight," A24, $671,582, 455 locations, $1,476 average, $21,294,977, 18 weeks.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

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