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Al Hurricane, 'Godfather of New Mexico music,' dies

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Al Hurricane, known as the "Godfather of New Mexico music" for developing a distinct sound bridging the state's unique Hispanic traditions with country and rock, died Sunday.

His son, Al Hurricane, Jr., told The Associated Press that his father died from complications related to a long battle against prostate cancer. Two of his daughters were at his side.

He was 81.

Hurricane, Jr. said his father had already said his goodbyes to his friends, fans and his children. "He didn't want people crying when it was his time to go," his son said.

His death came two years after the elder Hurricane went on a farewell tour following his announcement he had Stage 4 prostate cancer and kept performing despite chemotherapy treatment.

Born Alberto Nelson Sanchez on July 10, 1936, in the tiny village of Dixon, New Mexico, he was raised for a time in Ojo Sarco before moving to Arizona and later Albuquerque. He learned to play the guitar thanks to his mother and his father, a miner.

Hurricane began his professional music career by singing in Albuquerque Old Town restaurants before releasing his first songs, "Lobo" and "Racer" under the band Al Hurricane & the Night Rockers in 1962. He released his first album, "Mi Saxophone," in 1967. The album contained his signature song "Sentimiento," a ballad he wrote for his first wife and mother of his four children. Years later, a young Tejano singer named Selena would hear the song and record her own version of it.

In 1969, while on a trip to Colorado, a car carrying Hurricane and five band members skidded on an icy bridge and flipped five times. A piece of glass struck Hurricane's right eye, causing him to lose it. He'd wear an eye patch for this rest of his life, and it would become part of his unique look.

Other popular songs he recorded were "South Bend / Burrito" and "Mexican Cat / Pedro's Girlfriend." The songs blended traditional New Mexico corridos, Tejano, rock, folk, and country. Often, he sang them in both Spanish and English.

He went on to record more than 30 albums and received a number of awards while traveling internationally.

Following the 1980 Santa Fe prison riot — one of the most violent prison riots in U.S. history — Hurricane released the song "(El Corrido De) La Prison De Santa Fe" which was a narrative about the conditions that led to the uprising. Hurricane would later say the song did not seek to place blame for the violence but to tell a story of the riot that left 33 dead and 200 hurt.

In his later years, Hurricane would campaign on behalf of former U.S Rep. Heather Wilson and current New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, both Republicans.

Al Hurricane, Jr., says final funeral arraignments have not been made.

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Follow Russell Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras

Justin Timberlake will headline Super Bowl LII halftime show

Singer Justin Timberlake will be returning to the Super Bowl stage for the first time since he was part of Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” in 2004, the NFL confirmed Sunday.

>> Read more trending news

Timberlake, who will be performing in his third Super Bowl halftime show, will be the featured artist during the intermission of the NFL’s showcase game on Feb. 4, 2018 in Minneapolis. He previously appeared at Super Bowl XXXV in Tampa in 2001, but it was his appearance with Jackson at Super Bowl XXXVIII in Houston in 2004 that caused controversy.

An estimated 140 million people were watching the show when at the end, Timberlake popped off part of Jackson’s corset, exposing her breast. The incident, later described as a “wardrobe malfunction,” led to numerous complaints and a large fine by the Federal Communications Commission, The New York Times reported. The fine was eventually vacated by an appeals court, the Times reported.

During an interview televised during NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” broadcast, Mike Tirico asked Timberlake if the NFL had addressed the incident with him.

The singer smiled and said, “That won’t happen again.”

Timberlake, the 10-time Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter, rose to fame with the boy band ’N Sync. He has since had solo hits such as “Sexy Back,” “Cry Me a River” and “Rock Your Body.”

Timberlake also had a hit with “Can’t Stop the Feeling” on the soundtrack for the animated movie, “Trolls.”

While Jackson remains banned from singing at the Super Bowl. Several people on Twitter were angered by the choice of Timberlake. 

“It had better damn well be a 15 minute apology to Janet Jackson for hanging her out to dry in 2004,” one person tweeted. 

Another tweeted that Timberlake was “still ensuring white privilege remains in style in 2017. Meanwhile, Janet Jackson is still left in the cold.”

“ My only request is that you don't perform any of the music inspired by her brother or any Black artist. You love our culture, but disrespect our people.”

Loretta Lynn returns after stroke to honor Alan Jackson

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country star Alan Jackson, the late guitarist and singer Jerry Reed and songwriter Don Schlitz were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame on Sunday.

Country icon Loretta Lynn returned to the Hall of Fame for the first time since she suffered a stroke in May to formally induct Jackson. Lynn, who cancelled her tour dates this year to recover, said Jackson was the only person that could make her leave her house.

She recalled meeting Jackson when he was a nervous young artist decades ago and knowing then that he would "be one of the greatest singers in country music."

"He hadn't let me down," said Lynn, who is also a member of the Hall of Fame.

The 59-year-old Jackson is still one of country music's most successful solo artists, having sold nearly 45 million albums in the United States and had 26 singles reach the top of the Billboard country charts.

With his baritone voice and knack for telling stories about small town Southern life, the Newnan, Georgia-born singer was among a wave of neo-traditionalists that broke through in the 1990s.

He joked that when he was signed to Arista Nashville, a label started by Clive Davis, they had no idea how popular he would become.

"I was just a token country singer they signed for that label and bam, I took off," Jackson said.

Many of his hits became instant classics, from the barroom staple "Chattahoochee" to the somber "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)" written after the Sept. 11 attacks.

But he's also been characterized as shy and uneasy in the media spotlight.

"I am not really shy, just socially awkward," Jackson said. "I just don't like to talk too much."

Instead, he let his songs speak for him, often writing about his father, his wife and the everyday joys and sorrows of the average man. Other hits include "It's Five O'Clock Somewhere," ''A Lot About Livin' (And a Little 'Bout Love)" and "When Somebody Loves You."

George Strait, Alison Krauss and Lee Ann Womack each performed one of Jackson's songs in his honor.

Reed, who died at age 71 in 2008, was first known as an in-demand studio musician with a unique finger picking style on the guitar. He played for and wrote songs for stars like Elvis Presley and Porter Wagoner.

Reed, originally from Atlanta, became more popular when his songs began charting. His hit song "When You're Hot, You're Hot" earned him a Grammy award.

In later years, he started appearing in TV and movies, most notably playing Burt Reynolds' sidekick in "Smokey and the Bandit." He also sang many of the songs on the soundtrack, including "East Bound and Down."

His daughters, Seidina Hubbard and Lottie Zavala, accepted the honor on his behalf.

Hubbard said one of her fondest memories of growing up was listening "to the beautiful sound of that guitar in the house all the time."

Performing some of his songs were guitarists Tommy Emmanuel, John Knowles and Steve Wariner, while Jamey Johnson performed one of his personal favorites, "East Bound and Down."

Schlitz, 65, from Durham, North Carolina, had his first songwriting hit in 1978 when Kenny Rogers recorded his song, "The Gambler," which became Rogers' signature song throughout his career.

Other songs he helped write include "On the Other Hand" and "Forever and Ever, Amen," both sung by Randy Travis; "When You Say Nothing at All," recorded by both Keith Whitley and Alison Krauss; and "Strong Enough to Bend," by Tanya Tucker.

He was elected to the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2012 and helped to create the popular songwriters in the round format at Nashville's famed Bluebird Café.

Aloe Blacc and Vince Gill sang a duet version of "The Gambler," while singers Charlie Worsham and Mary Chapin Carpenter also performed his songs in his honor.

Schlitz gave some advice to his grandchildren seated in the audience from what he had learned in his career.

"No one does this alone. In your life, be a part of something bigger than yourself," Schlitz said.

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Online:

http://countrymusichalloffame.org/

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Follow Kristin M. Hall at www.twitter.com/kmhall

Justin Timberlake invited back to Super Bowl halftime show

Justin Timberlake has finally been invited back to the Super Bowl halftime show, 14 years after the "wardrobe malfunction" with Janet Jackson caused a national controversy.

The NFL announced Sunday night that Timberlake will headline the Super Bowl halftime show Feb. 4 in Minnesota.

This will be Timberlake's third Super Bowl halftime performance, the most for any entertainer. Timberlake performed at the 2001 Super Bowl with N'Sync, and he sang "Rock Your Body" with Jackson in 2004 in Houston. That performance concluded with Timberlake ripping her costume to reveal her right breast bare except for a nipple shield.

During an interview broadcast at halftime of NBC's "Sunday Night Football," Timberlake laughed off questions about a repeat of the infamous moment, which drew CBS a $550,000 fine from the Federal Communications Commission that was later overturned.

"That won't happen this time," he said.

Timberlake has won 10 Grammys, and the Tennessee native also has won four Emmys. He said the best Super Bowl performances have spoken to the mood of the nation.

"What I really want to do is take the opportunity to put together a performance that feels like it unifies," Timberlake said. "I feel like that would be the ultimate accomplishment, and then the icing on the cake is at some point within that 12 minutes that everybody is shaking their booty."

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More AP NFL: http://pro32.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

38 accuse writer/director James Toback of sexual harassment

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Writer and director James Toback, who received an Oscar nomination for writing "Bugsy," has been accused of sexual harassment by 38 women in a report published Sunday in The Los Angeles Times.

In the report, many of the women allege that Toback approached them on the streets of New York City and promised stardom. His meetings would often end with sexual questions and Toback masturbating in front of them or simulating sexual intercourse with them, according to the accounts.

The 72-year-old denied the allegations to The Los Angeles Times, saying he never met any of the women, or if he had it "was for five minutes and (I) have no recollection."

Thirty-one of the women spoke on the record including Louise Post, who is a guitarist and vocalist for the band Veruca Salt, and "As the World Turns" actress Terri Conn.

Actress Echo Danon recalled an incident on the set of his film "Black and White" where Toback put his hands on her and said that he would ejaculate if she looked at his eyes and pinched his nipples.

"Everyone wants to work, so they put up with it," Danon told the Times. "That's why I put up with it. Because I was hoping to get another job."

On Sunday afternoon, Times reporter Glenn Whipp said the number of accusers had doubled since the story had published.

Toback hasn't responded to a request for comment from The Associated Press.

The report comes amid the ongoing downfall of producer Harvey Weinstein, who has been accused of sexual harassment and assault by over three dozen women. He was fired from the company he co-founded and widely denounced by his Hollywood peers.

"James Toback damn you for stealing, damn you for traumatizing," tweeted Weinstein accuser Rose McGowan on Sunday.

Another Weinstein accuser, actress-director Asia Argento, tweeted, "So proud of my sisters for bringing down yet another pig" in response to the Toback report.

Though less widely known than Weinstein, Toback has had a successful four-decade career in Hollywood and has a devoted following who have praised him for his originality and outsized, deeply flawed characters.

A New York native, Harvard graduate, creative writing professor and compulsive gambler, Toback used his own life as inspiration for his first produced screenplay, "The Gambler," which came out in 1974 and starred James Caan. The film was remade in 2014 with Mark Walhberg and Brie Larson.

He also wrote and directed the Harvey Keitel film "Fingers," the loosely autobiographical "The Pick-up Artist," which starred Robert Downey Jr. and Molly Ringwald, "Two Girls and a Guy," also with Downey Jr. and Heather Graham, "Harvard Man," with Sarah Michelle Gellar, and the Mike Tyson documentary "Tyson."

His one and only Oscar nomination is for writing the Barry Levinson-directed and Warren Beatty-starring "Bugsy."

Toback's upcoming film, "The Private Life of a Modern Woman," stars Sienna Miller and Alec Baldwin and debuted at the Venice Film Festival earlier this year.

Like Weinstein, reports of Toback's alleged behavior toward women have been around for decades. Spy magazine wrote about him in 1989, and the now-defunct website Gawker also published accounts from women in New York who had had run-ins with Toback.

But in the past few weeks, amid the Weinstein scandal and the rise of the #MeToo social media movement, in which women are revealing instances of sexual harassment and assault, more reports have emerged about the conduct of many working in the entertainment industry.

Just days ago, top Amazon Studios executive Roy Price resigned following sexual harassment allegations made by a "Man in the High Castle" producer.

On Sunday, a few in Hollywood began denouncing Toback on social media, including "Bridesmaids" director Paul Feig, who tweeted that Toback "Is a disgrace."

"One of the main jobs of a director is to create a safe environment for the actors," Feig wrote.

"Doctor Strange" director Scott Derrickson added, "If there is a Hell, James Toback will be in it."

"Guardians of the Galaxy" director James Gunn wrote a lengthy Facebook post Sunday about the allegations, saying that he has personally met at least 15 women who have said they have had these kinds of encounters with Toback, including three women he has dated, two friends and a family member.

"For over twenty years now, I've been bringing up James Toback every chance I could in groups of people," Gunn wrote. "I couldn't stop him, but I could warn people about him."

Fox offers Bill O’Reilly big contract after $32 million settlement, Gretchen Carlson reacts

Fox News offered Bill O’Reilly a $25 million contract even though O’Reilly had agreed to settle a sexual harassment claim for $32 million, according to The New York Times.

>> Read more trending news

The Times reported that O’Reilly settled out of court with former Fox News legal analyst Lis Wiehl just months before he was dismissed from the network.

O’Reilly categorized the Times piece as a “smear article” about him and defended himself on his website.

“In its latest diatribe against Bill O’Reilly, the Times printed leaked information provided by anonymous sources that is out of context, false, defamatory, and obviously designed to embarrass Bill O’Reilly and to keep him from competing in the marketplace,” a statement on O’Reilly’s website said.

“In the more than 20 years Bill O’Reilly worked at Fox News, not one complaint was filed against him with the human resources department or legal department by a coworker, even on the anonymous hotline,” the statement continued. 

The New York Times has copies of two letters written by 21st Century Fox lawyers attesting to that fact.”

>> Related: Recently released details put a new spin on when Bill O’Reilly and Fox News parted ways

After O’Reilly tweeted a link to his post, former “Fox & Friends” host Carlson responded.

“Nobody pays $32 million for false allegations – nobody,” Carlson wrote.

Carlson settled out of court in 2016, after she left Fox News amid her own allegations of sexual harassment against then chiarmen Roger Ailes.

Palestinian festival drops film over director's Israel trips

RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — A Palestinian film festival on Sunday canceled the screening of a movie by a Lebanese-French director following pressure by activists who opposed his previous work in Israel.

"The Insult," the latest movie by director Ziad Doueiri, was set to close the Palestinian Days of Cinema festival on Monday and was competing for the festival's top award.

But after a charged campaign by activists on social media, the city of Ramallah, which was hosting the screening, told the festival to scrap the showing, according to Khulood Badawi, a spokeswoman for the festival, which agreed to the cancellation. It was not clear if the film was still eligible for an award.

Doueiri's previous film, "The Attack," about a Palestinian surgeon living in Tel Aviv who discovers that his wife carried out a deadly suicide attack, was filmed in Israel and featured several Israeli actors. That film was banned in Lebanon and most Arab countries. Last month, Lebanese authorities briefly detained the Paris-based Doueiri because of his visits to Israel.

"The director showed no remorse, and insisted on his stand, and we think screening any of his work at a Palestinian cinema festival would be a big mistake" said Abed Hamayel, an activist who campaigned against the film's screening.

A segment of Palestinians has long called for Arab political, economic and cultural leaders to boycott Israel as a way to prevent normalizing ties with the Jewish state. An international movement of activists also calls for boycotts, divestment and sanctions against people or companies doing business with Israel.

Doueiri could not be reached for comment, but Kamel Elbasha, a Palestinian actor who stars in the film, criticized the decision.

"Ziad was punished for that movie which was banned in all Arab countries," he said, adding that the activists were "mixing things up, lying and distorting facts," and questioning their motives. Elbasha won the best actor award for his role in the film at the Venice Film Festival in September.

Film Lab Palestine, the group behind the Palestinian festival, noted that "The Insult," was being screened in Lebanon and in other festivals in the Middle East. The film, which focuses on a tense exchange between a Lebanese Christian and a Palestinian refugee, explores the fraught place of Palestinians in Lebanese society.

"'The Insult' was selected for this year's edition of the festival since it addresses an important issue for the Palestinian people," said a statement from the group. It also said the film was selected because it stars Elbasha, who hails from east Jerusalem.

A scary box office weekend for everyone but Tyler Perry

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It was a spooky weekend at the box office for nearly everyone but Tyler Perry.

Perry's comedy sequel "Boo 2! A Madea Halloween" scared up a healthy $21.7 million in its first weekend in theaters, but the waters were rough for other new openers including the disaster epic "Geostorm," the firefighter drama "Only the Brave" and the crime thriller "The Snowman."

Made for a reported $25 million, Perry's film drew a mostly older and female audience, who gave it an A- CinemaScore. "Boo 2!" did a little less business than the first film, which opened to $28.5 million just last year.

"Given that it's a sequel, its performance is at the higher end of our expectations," said David Spitz, who heads up domestic distribution for Lionsgate.

The studio expects the film to hold well into next weekend due to increased interest because of Halloween, but it will also face some competition with the horror pic "Jigsaw."

But a slight drop for a sequel hardly compares to the catastrophe of "Geostorm," a long-delayed $120 million disaster epic starring Gerard Butler that only managed to open to $13.3 million from North American theaters.

A co-production between Skydance Media and Warner Bros. Pictures, "Geostorm" marks the directorial debut of "Independence Day" producer Dean Devlin. The film was shot back in late 2014 and lousy test screenings resulted in $15 million of reshoots, pushing back the release over a year and a half.

But the reshoots didn't seem to help the final product, which has been widely panned by critics and shunned overall by audiences. Those who did turn out gave it a B- CinemaScore.

Another possibly too-timely film, "Only the Brave," about the Granite Mountain Hotshots who took on the June 2013 Yarnell Hill Fire, also failed to attract sufficient audiences this weekend. The Sony film starring Josh Brolin, Jeff Bridges and Jennifer Connelly opened in fifth place with $6 million.

At $38 million, the production budget was more reasonable than "Geostorm," however.

But despite good reviews, it opened behind two holdovers — the horror pic "Happy Death Day" which landed in third place with $9.4 million and "Blade Runner 2049" which took in $7.2 million in its third weekend in theaters.

Universal and Working Title's "The Snowman," starring Michael Fassbender and based on the Jo Nesbo book, also failed to make a splash. The critically derided pic debuted in eighth place with $3.4 million from 1,812 theaters.

The director, Thomas Alfredson has been widely acknowledging the film's shortcomings and confusing plot in the press, saying that they did not have time to shoot the entire script. Audiences gave it a deathly D CinemaScore.

Things looked a little brighter for the limited releases this weekend. Both playing in four theaters, the Colin Farrell and Nicole Kidman film "The Killing of a Sacred Deer," took in $114,585 and "Wonderstruck," starring Julianne Moore," earned $68,762.

"As great as September was, October has been really scary," said Paul Dergarabedian, the senior media analyst for comScore.

Theatrical exhibitors and studio distribution heads are gathering in Miami Beach, Florida this week for the ShowEast Film Expo to discuss the state of movie going and it couldn't come at a better time, when old truisms about what works and what doesn't work at the box office are being challenged weekly.

Dergarabedian said even releasing a quality film isn't a sure path to success anymore.

"Even well-reviewed movies like 'American Made,' 'Only the Brave' and 'Blade Runner 2049' are having trouble gaining traction," Dergarabedian said.

The industry will be looking to the big event films, like "Thor: Ragnarok," out Nov. 3, "Justice League" and "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" to get the year back to even.

"Trying to figure out audiences and what they want is the key to the future. Audiences are voting with their presence or absence at the movie theater," Dergarabedian said. "They're staying away now, but that might change in two weeks."

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. "Boo 2! A Madea Halloween," $21.7 million.

2. "Geostorm," $13.3 million ($36.4 million international).

3. "Happy Death Day," $9.4 million ($6.5 million international).

4. "Blade Runner 2049," $7.2 million ($14.3 million international).

5. "Only the Brave," $6 million.

6. "The Foreigner," $5.5 million ($2.7 million international).

7. "It," $3.5 million ($12.8 million international).

8. "The Snowman," $3.4 million ($6.6 million international).

9. "American Made," $3.2 million ($2.7 million international).

10. "Kingsman: The Golden Circle," $3 million ($48.7 million international).

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Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore:

1. "Kingsman: The Golden Circle," $48.7 million.

2. "Geostorm," $36.4 million.

3. "Never Say Die," $15 million.

4. "Blade Runner 2049," $14.3 million.

5. "It," $12.8 million.

6. "Bad Genius," $7.6 million.

7. "The Outlaws," $6.8 million.

8. "The Snowman," $6.6 million.

9. "Happy Death Day," $6.5 million.

10. "The Lego Ninjago Movie," $4.7 million.

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Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

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Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ldbahr

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This story has been corrected to show "Boo 2! A Madea Halloween" was made for a reported $25 million, not $35 million

Officials: EF1 tornado tore part of Oklahoma casino roof off

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — An overnight batch of severe storms spawned an EF1 tornado that tore part of a casino roof off in central Oklahoma during a concert and downed power lines and trees throughout the state, emergency managers said Sunday.

The twister touched down in Cleveland County, one of several counties where National Weather Service officials were surveying damage after reports of as many as four tornadoes late Saturday. No injuries were reported.

Part of the Riverwind Casino's roof was ripped off in Norman during a Beach Boys concert Saturday. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, who was among those attending the show, told KWTV that there was "this huge flood of rain coming through the roof" and she had to be evacuated from the casino twice.

Casino operators said in a statement Sunday that they had no time to alert guests before the storm hit the property because it happened at the same time that the National Weather Service issued a tornado warning for the area. The casino has no electricity and parts of the property are closed off while repairs are made, spokeswoman Kym Koch said. Reservations were canceled through at least Tuesday, she said.

"Like all Oklahomans, we know that weather events such as this can hit without warning and unfortunately, that is what happened at Riverwind last night," Koch said.

Meteorologists classify an EF1 tornado as one capable of producing winds up to 110 mph, said Keli Cain, a spokeswoman for the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management. She said other businesses, including a hotel, also were damaged along with cars and trucks during the storms.

National Weather Service meteorologist John Pike said officials were surveying Tillman, Comanche, McClain and Seminole counties, where the tornadoes and damage were reported. Forecasters had issued eight tornado warnings as the storms developed Saturday evening ahead of a cold front.

Since most of the storms hit rural or remote areas, widespread damage was minimal, Pike said.

"Anytime we walk away like that, you can say we dodged a bullet," he said.

He said the weather is expected to change again heading into the coming weekend, when the state could see its coldest temperatures yet this year and parts of southwestern and western Oklahoma might possibly get their first freeze.

Mariah Carey’s ex-fiance James Packer calls relationship a ‘mistake’

A year after calling off their engagement, James Packer is talking about his breakup with Mariah Carey for the first time.

>> Read more trending news

“I was at a low point in my personal life,” Packer said about his time with Carey.

“She was kind, exciting and fun. Mariah is a woman of substance. But, it was a mistake for her and a mistake for me.”

The couple first got together in 2015 and had plans to get married. Nine months after getting engaged, however, they called everything off in October 2016 while they were vacationing in Greece.

Carey, who was reportedly “blindsided” by the breakup, famously went on to burn her wedding gown in her “I Don’t” music video by tossing it into a fire.

>> Related: Mariah Carey is asking for much more than cash in her settlement with ex-fiancé James Packer

Mariah was totally blindsided by James. She read the news in Woman’s Day Australia that said he dumped her,” a source told Us Weekly. “Mariah knew they were having problems, but all relationships have issues — it wasn’t the kind of thing where she thought she’d read in the paper that she got dumped. She was devastated; she was shocked.”

A representative for the singer later confirmed the news in a statement that read, “Mariah and James had a fight in Greece, and have not seen each other since. The fight was not because of any cheating allegations or excessive spending by Mariah. James is one of the most successful businessmen in the world. They are trying to work it out. Right now, they’re not sure if they will stay together.”

>> Related: Mariah Carey slams ex-fiancé James Packer and now there are threats of lawsuits

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